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Quiz time, Brit film industry and Ellington for Cohen

Posted by lostincci on January 19, 2011

As 2011 gets into gear, CMCI Lecturer Dr. Harvey G. Cohen has been making some media appearances.

On 31 December 2010, Cohen served as a panelist for the BBC World Service’s Newshour year-end quiz, broadcast to dozens of countries around the world. His teammate was Newshour presenter Claire Bolderson, and he played against BBC Sports correspondent Tim Franks and comedian and author Natalie Haynes. The questions mainly came from the worlds of politics, culture and sports, with numerous soundbites being played which the panelists had to identify. After leading for most of the show, Cohen’s team lost with the last question asked, 21-20, and probably his premiere contribution to this light exercise was an explanation of the musical and historical significance of King of Rock and Soul Solomon Burke, who passed away this year — and was the subject of one of the quiz questions Cohen answered correctly.

On 15 January 2011, Cohen was quoted twice in an article in the Financial Times’ weekend edition about the British film industry’s inability to become financially independent during the last century. Along with most British film historians, he cited how the economic advantages of the American film industry enabled them to dominate the British film industry, in terms of exhibition as well as production. For more details, consult the article.

Lastly, Cohen appeared live this week on the Raleigh, North Carolina Fox affiliate radio stations WCBQ and WHNC discussing his recent book Duke Ellington’s America (University of Chicago Press, 2010) for twenty minutes on Dr Alvin Jones’ daily morning radio program. The unarchived conversation mostly focused on Ellington’s upbringing in Washington D.C. at the turn of the twentieth century, and how the African American and musical culture of the area influenced his music, career and beliefs.

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